The Writing Life

The Eastside Writing Room-Tucson

Why go to a writing meeting where you don’t write

Tuesday, February 20. Another full and informative meeting of the Eastside Writing Room. We zoom each Tuesday 11:30 AM MT time to share our writing intentions for that day. There’s something especially powerful about stating intentions in person, and to a group of people who are staring, quite intently, at you, and are interested in what you have to say.
90% of the time I do what I say I have to do. If I don’t it’s because writing has led me down some other path, equally as interesting.

The Eastside Writing Room

A free Zoom group, no fees, no writing critiquing, but lots of sharing of writing ideas, resources, and a place to declare your writing plan. For adult writers, published or not; any genre, no rants, no crosstalk, just good ole listening and support.

 

Ethel Lee-Miller blogs regularly about people, the power of words, and her writing life. She retired after 30 years of teaching, and semi-retired from coaching, and professional editing. Founder of the Eastside Writing Room based in Tucson AZ, she’s posted 100s of blogs, and is the author of Thinking of Miller Place, and Seedlings, Stories of Relationships. These days she writes to inspire, to connect with folks, teaching about the power of words, gather writers together, and for the pure enjoyment of it. Ethel enjoys speaking and storytelling at Odyssey Storytelling, Artists Standing Strong Together, Center for Spiritual Living Tucson, and anywhere there’s a mic or a Zoom room.

The Raised Eyebrow

laptop with writing and coffee mug

Musings From My Writing Life

My mother had this thing she did with her eyebrow. That is not a typo. Eyebrow. Singular. She could raise her eyebrow quite high so it peaked in a perfect arc. It was very noticeable. When accompanied by a low murmur of my name or “girls,“ my sisters and I were trained to look at Mom. The raised eyebrow was a cease and desist signal, meaning everything from “use a soft voice, please,” to “don’t do that,” to “stop right now.” It got results with me, because I was always stunned into wondering how she did that – with just one eyebrow. So it distracted me from whatever behavior was deemed wrong enough to elicit the raised eyebrow.

For years I practiced in front of the bathroom mirror. I had the murmur down. “Muthhhh-errr” but both eyebrows popped up. I held my one eyebrow down with my hand. I taped it. Closed both eyes and then did the raise attempt; but of course, I had to open them to look and there they were – up in a surprised double arc.

I don’t remember exactly when it happened. Maybe a pre-puberty birthday, or a Christmas when I had been exceedingly good. I randomly gave it a go while doing a toothbrush rinse and voila – up went my left eyebrow – solo flight. Was it a fluke? I tried again. Ha! There it was again. The Single Raised Eyebrow (SRE). I had liftoff!  But who could I tell? Certainly not my mother. I shared my discovery with my twin. She tried. No luck. It seemed this was to be my own inherited trait.  

This quirky anomaly morphed into being able to wiggle my right ear at will. Only the right. That had entertainment value and is still a fun icebreaker. 

But the single raised eyebrow (SRE) has served me well for decades. When I was teaching, I developed the use of SRE with my young munchkins. The murmured name, the single raised eyebrow and slight shake of the head. Cease and desist, please. Followed by a slight smile or wink when compliance was achieved. 

SRE is effective in dealing with adults who may be difficult people. Many people indicate surprise or doubt with the double eyebrows. A paltry attempt. But the SRE can instantly signal a hmmm look with an I doubt that message.

In an email post from TUT (The Universe Talks) I discovered my top trending use for SRE.  “In case they look at you funny, when you tell them of your loftiest dreams, desires, and a beautiful dream vacation home, all you have to do is turn your head sideways, raise an eyebrow, and slowly say, “I… have… connections. “ Because I do.

I love this use of the SRE. Even though I know I have many cheerleaders in my life, sometimes people will give me a look or fling a phrase my way that is intended to keep me “safe,” aka inert/stagnant, or the assassinator of dreams “don’t make waves.” Using the SRE for the “I have connections” message is most deliciously gratifying.

Ethel Lee-Miller blogs regularly about people, the power of words, and her writing life. She retired after 30 years of teaching, and semi-retired from coaching, and professional editing. Founder of the Eastside Writing Room based in Tucson AZ, she’s posted 100s of blogs, and is the author of Thinking of Miller Place, and Seedlings, Stories of Relationships. These days she writes to inspire, to connect with folks, teaching about the power of words, gather writers together, and for the pure enjoyment of it. Ethel enjoys speaking and storytelling at Odyssey Storytelling, Artists Standing Strong Together, Center for Spiritual Living Tucson, and anywhere there’s a mic or a Zoom room.

Meet Each Day

My Extraordinary Friends

I have close friends who welcome each day with optimism, in spite of aging quirks that crop up here and there, and often overcoming some pretty serious challenges. The quirks started with me after I hit 70, forcing me to finally label myself at the “latter part of middle age.” Things like wrinkles, leg cramps, permanent “laugh lines,” are all parts of me in my aging. More serious events like severe cases of shingles or a stroke can whisper to me to hold onto resentment at these unasked for changes, and fall into the “why me?”

Tools, aka Weapons, to Fight the Bruises, Blues, Blahs

But… I have weapons to fight the lure of mental atrophy:

Self-care: Watch for HALT: hungry, angry, lonely, or tired. Or just plain peckish. Or really mad/scared.

Observe: I think of our neighbor who, most days, gets up, dresses quite stylishly, and takes a slow walk down our hill and up again. She’s 98.

Bring the outside world in: My email brings me positive stories from Daily Good, BOTWC (Because of Them We Can), TUT (The Universe Talks), and Maria Popova’s Marginalian supplying a daily dose of optimism and cultural criticisms that satisfy my intellectual curiosity, examples of compassion, thoughtful playing with words, and small and large successes and kindness in our society. I figure what I focus on is bound to be repeated. 

My husband shares interesting stories that he gleans from his daily reading of the New York Times, Wall Street Journal and other online papers. Recently he sent this from The New York Times:

At 116, She Has Outlived Generations of Loved Ones. But Her Entire Town Has Become Family

“When the nation’s oldest person has a birthday, a California community makes sure to celebrate. Edith Ceccarelli is the oldest known person in the United States and the second oldest on Earth. She has lived through two World Wars, the advent of the Ford Model T — and the two deadliest pandemics in American history.”

Now that’s extraordinary. What will stay with me longer than the town’s events to celebrate her, was the bit about her dancing partner passing away when she had passed her 100th birthday. She put an ad in the paper for a new dance partner so she could keep dancing. Radical optimism.

Some Reasons to Celebrate Life

  • My friend of 57 years and I laughed on the phone as we reminisced about escapades in New York City when we thought nothing of dancing late into the night and went off to work the next day filled with energy.
  • When our neighbor brings an offering of her homemade chocolate chip cookies to us – “still warm,” for no reason other than she’s a gem of a neighbor, I am filled with gratitude.
  • I look at my husband’s face as he reads or snoozes and am aware, once again, that I love him more deeply than I did 35 years ago.
  • Splashes of color that provide a natural kaleidoscope in a January sunrise in Arizona fill me with awe.
  • And when I’m listening to the masterful, whimsical lyrics of Pink Martini’s “Hold On Little Tomato,” I just have to get up and dance.
  • These and so many little and big things make it easy, fun, and wonderful to greet each day.

How did you meet the day today?

Ethel Lee-Miller blogs regularly about people, the power of words, and her writing life. She retired after 30 years of teaching, and semi-retired from coaching, and professional editing. Founder of the Eastside Writing Room based in Tucson AZ, she’s posted 100s of blogs, and is the author of Thinking of Miller Place, and Seedlings, Stories of Relationships. These days she writes to inspire, to connect with folks, teaching about the power of words, gather writers together, and for the pure enjoyment of it. Ethel enjoys speaking and storytelling at Odyssey Storytelling, Artists Standing Strong Together, Center for Spiritual Living Tucson, and anywhere there’s a mic or a Zoom room.

This Brand New Year-2024

January Slipped Below the Horizon

The Christmas tree is packed away for the 16th time outliving its 10-year guarantee. Thank you cards are done. I’m  curbing my extreme disappointment that my creative gift package that went out to my beautiful great-nieces was a victim of porch pirates. and blessing on my nieces who graciously accepted this downturn of Christmas fate. 

I only found one small decoration that missed the de-Christmasing around our house.

“Are you sure everything is away?”

“Yes, yes, I told you a thousand times, we’re done…” Oops.

Christmas is in my rearview mirror and I’m looking ahead. Writing 2024 on documents is almost automatic. Despite the rollercoaster of economics, abuse of language, natural and national events that disrupt lives, and a sad focus on doom and gloom from some media sites, I find small kindnesses and generous giving that carry a big  impact.

The Piano 

A Hospital Visit

Very early in January I was visiting a friend at Tucson Medical Center. If you’ve not been there for one reason or another, it’s big. I parked in the West Parking lot, walked down two flights, around the corner and into the lobby. The walk to my destination was long but hallways are decorated with very attractive prints and paintings. Nice idea to set a pleasant tone. 

After navigating a maze of hallways and turns, I found the Cardiac Unit way over on the Eastside and my friend’s room.

After my visit I reversed directions and headed back to the West entrance. As I got near the lobby I heard some really nice piano music. 

Great idea, I thought, as people enter or exit, they’ll hear music playing over the sound system. The music was so smooth … and live.

A man was playing the piano that was over in the corner of the lobby, up against the wall. His back was to me, which I thought was a shame. You should be center court. 

The music was lovely; not jazzy, not classical. It was kind of dreamy, notes rippling up and down in harmony.

I veered away from the exit door and went over by the piano. The guy was kind of hunched over, but very relaxed. After my visit, mixed with happiness at being able to see my friend and anxiety for him, this piano music was a perfect remedy for me. 

“That is lovely,” I said. The guy glanced up at me but kept rippling. “Do you work here? Are you the piano man?”

 “Oh no,” he said turning a bit to face me. “I’m just taking my break and I like to play the piano.”

“You’re really good.”

“Well, thank you so much.” He smiled a wide smile and turned back and started playing again. 

Thank you, piano man.

Ethel Lee-Miller blogs regularly about people, the power of words, and her writing life. She retired after 30 years of teaching, and semi-retired from coaching, and professional editing, Founder of the Eastside Writing Room based in Tucson AZ, she’s posted 100s of blogs, and is the author of Thinking of Miller Place, and Seedlings, Stories of Relationships. These days she writes to inspire, to connect with folks, teaching about the power of words, gather writers together, and for the pure enjoyment of it. Ethel enjoys speaking and storytelling at Odyssey Storytelling, Artists Standing Strong Together, Center for Spiritual Living Tucson, and anywhere there’s a mic or a Zoom room.

3 Big Ideas of Writing Advice

Early in my writing career, (1996) Julia Cameron’s The Artist’s Way  was one of my favorite books – quotes, creative affirmation, and the Morning Pages. 

Write

Big Idea #1   Morning Pages

Morning Pages inspired me. So that’s how you do it. Get up even earlier than I already did for my teaching job. I was also motivated, so I did it. 

My kitchen nook was cozy, lit by the spring sunrise. I loved writing each day and certainly did more than the recommended three pages a day – for a while. Soon this schedule became a “have to” instead of a “want to.” I tapered, then wrote occasionally, then I abandoned it.

I read about writers who got up at 5:00 AM. every single day – even weekends – and wrote for hours. Sounded like suffering to me. But somewhere the idea of sustained writing stuck. I just didn’t like to write all alone early in the morning. 

Here’s what still works for me in 2024: You don’t have to write every day to be a “writer.” A daily schedule may not be for you. But you do have to put pen to paper, fingers to keyboard, or voice to tape, and get something down, i.e., written. 

B.I.C.

                                                                                                  

Big Idea #2    B.I.C. 

Part A:  Make a 24” X 18” sign with large, bold letters B I C.  “Butt In Chair” Tack it up where you’ll see it. Sit down quite close to your writing area. Write. 

Part B:  Commit to a specific schedule for 7, or 10, or 14 days. “I will write five pages every morning.” “I will write every other day for four hours.” Keep a log. There’s nothing like seeing it in “black and white” to keep you honest. If it works, renew your commitment; if not, devise a new one.  

Part C:  Acknowledge that you wrote something. To your group, to yourself. Share your habit of writing with others. Have them join you. Brag. “I wrote 1000 words this morning.” Share your writing – one on one, at open mics, storytelling events, conferences. Writing can be solitary but support and affirmation from others is like an energy smoothie, minus the calories. 

Be in the company of writers 

Big Idea #3   Join a writing group. 

One that writes together, or one that critiques (with care), or one that shares tips, or prompts. Be in the company of dedicated writers. Steer clear of dabblers. I commit to one day a week with my Eastside Writing Room colleagues. Minimum of 1 ½  hours, sometimes it becomes 3. That’s a long BIC. 

Pre-Covid we established the habit of gathering weekly for two hours at a host’s home. No phone, no interruptions. State your intention for that day. Write. It was a tiny bit social and a whole lot of writing. I set aside an additional morning each week for more creative writing and another afternoon or evening for the business of writing. 

Covid did not stop us. We Zoomed each Tuesday for 40 minutes, each of us sharing our intention for that day’s writing. I think because our two-hour habit had been established, it was not that difficult to continue to write on our own after the Zoom time. Post-pandemic we continue to Zoom each Tuesday with each writer sharing their intention for that day. We added in-person meetings plus Zoom once a month. I still separate my creative writing and the business of writing times. Not so much in the evening these days.

About once a month, I find I’ll write for hours every morning for an entire week – because my writing process has had me pre-writing while walking around, scribbling snippets on scraps of paper, dictating ideas to my phone, or on line at Safeway. Pretty soon I just have to sit down – BIC – and write. I’m a writer. 

Check out our recent Eastside Writing Room successes after accumulating those Tuesday hours of writing.  “EWR Celebrating Us -The Eastside Writing Room” Oct. 20, 2023

Looking for a writing group? Check us out. Eastside Writing Room -Ethel Lee-Miller

Ethel Lee-Miller blogs regularly about people, the power of words, and her writing life. She retired after 30 years of teaching, semi-retired from coaching, editing, and gathering writers to publicly share their work. Founder of the Eastside Writing Room based in Tucson AZ, she’s posted 100s of blogs, and is the author of Thinking of Miller Place, and Seedlings, Stories of Relationships. These days she writes to inspire, to connect with folks, teaching about the power of words, gather writers together, and for the pure enjoyment of it. Ethel enjoys sharing stories at Odyssey Storytelling, Artists Standing Strong Together, and anywhere there’s a mic or a Zoom room.

The Eastside Writing Room

laptop with writing and coffee mugOur 11th year- each Tuesday, each week, each month. Same routine with renewed energy each time we meet.

A Spell Against Stagnation

January is still the new year but may not fully hold that exact NEWness of Jan. 1. 
Reading Maria Popova’s end of year newsletter got me charged up again. She shared John O’Donohue’s beautiful piece on Beginnings, an antidote to stagnation.  
Here’s a snippet of his essay: “Perhaps the art of harvesting the secret riches of our lives is best achieved when we place profound trust in the act of beginning. Risk might be our greatest ally. To live a truly creative life, we always need to cast a critical look at where we presently are, attempting always to discern where we have become stagnant and where new beginning might be ripening. There can be no growth if we do not remain open and vulnerable to what is new and different. I have never seen anyone take a risk for growth that was not rewarded a thousand times over.
Thank you,  Maria Popova 

Thinking/Knowing you are a writer?  

Join us Tuesday – take a risk with your writing intention. The Eastside Writing Room (Tucson AZ) zooms each Tuesday for adult writers to share their writing intention for that day. Saying it out loud as other writers nod with anticipation has quite a bit of power to motivate the action to BIC (butt in chair and write)

Want to Join Us?

Contact Ethel Lee-Miller to join us. No fee. No interruptions. Just write.

Ethel Lee-Miller blogs regularly about people, the power of words, and her writing life. She retired after 30 years of teaching, semi-retired from coaching, editing, and gathering writers to publicly share their work. Founder of the Eastside Writing Room based in Tucson AZ, she’s posted 100s of blogs, and is the author of Thinking of Miller Place, and Seedlings, Stories of Relationships. These days she writes to inspire, to connect with folks, teaching about the power of words, gather writers together, and for the pure enjoyment of it. Ethel enjoys sharing stories at Odyssey Storytelling, Artists Standing Strong Together, and anywhere there’s a mic or a Zoom room.

FEB. 6 -New Date -Book Publicity That Makes Sense/Cents

FEBRUARY 6, 2024. A NEW YEAR. A NEW DATE for our writing event.

I’m thrilled to announce Lorraine Ash’s online Book Publicity That Makes Sense/Cents has been rescheduled for February 6, 2024.

12:00-1:30 PM Arizona time.   2:00-3:30 PM EST

Offered by The Eastside Writing Room of Tucson, Arizona 

    • Open to anyone- anywhere
    • FREE—Limited to 40 people
    • Participants will get a Zoom invitation to the presentation

Learn about myriad types of publicity from reviews, digital ads, and book signings to reader reviews, podcast interviews, media outreach, and more. We’ll also tackle the big questions—whether to hire a publicist, how to convert awareness to sales, what actually works in the age of the Internet, and how much to spend.

TO RESERVE YOUR PLACE:

Click to contact Ethel Lee-Miller Reserve by February 1, 2024

PRAISE FOR BOOK PUBLICITY THAT MAKES SENSE/CENTS

I highly recommend attending this. I will be flying that day, but I have already implemented many of the suggestions Lorraine shared because she is my editor. Lorraine’s knowledge, research and delivery is outstanding and a wonderful way to kick start your efforts in the new year. ~ Nicole  Smith, author, Diagnosis Dementia

My own experience with Lorraine Ash began in 2004 when I attended a Memoir Workshop led by Lorraine. I didn’t realize I was writing a memoir but her experiences and activities opened up the vista that my family stories could/would become a memoir. And we were off. Her journalistic experience, her own experience as an author and presenter, and her generosity in sharing her knowledge, were huge stepping stones for my growth as a writer and published author. And it’s only gotten better. After taking this workshop with the Write Group of Montclair (my old stomping grounds) I knew I had to bring Lorraine Ash to AZ – and beyond. Prepare to be WOWED!  ~ Ethel Lee-Miller

AND AGAIN- we’ve got a spot for you

Are you ready to publish? Thinking about publishing? Already published but stalled after the first rush of sales? To reserve your place, contact Ethel Lee-Miller ethel.lee.miller@gmail.com Reserve by February 1, 2024

 

 

 

 

 

Lorraine Ash is a journalist, memoirist, public speaker, presenter and writer whose more than 20 years of literary experiences make her  presentations gems for aspiring and experienced writers.

 

 

 

 

Ethel Lee-Miller blogs regularly about people, the power of words, and her writing life. She retired after 30 years of teaching, semi-retired from coaching, editing, and gathering writers to publicly share their work. She is the author of Thinking of Miller Place, and Seedlings, Stories of Relationships. She is the founder of the Eastside Writing Room, now in its 11th year of  supporting dedicated adult writers to do what they love- write. These days, in Tucson Arizona, she writes to inspire, to connect with folks, teaching about the power of words, gather writers together, and for the pure enjoyment of it. Ethel enjoys sharing stories at Odyssey Storytelling, Artists Standing Strong Together, and anywhere there’s a mic or a Zoom room.

2024- It is a NEW year

           Happy New Year 2024!

WE’VE CROSSED THE THRESHOLD. 2024 IS HERE!

Here’s what I’ve got in mind that’s coming my way – happy times, pleasant weather, family and friends who adore me, a feeling of gratitude each morning. What a day! Each morning I realize this day is mine, or Yay, I’m vertical. Or, as a my brother-in-law said, “Hey I’m on this side of the dirt.”  Another positive thinker told me, “I’m dangerously close to being fantastic!”  

I know abundant health, and wonderful outcomes are approaching for my writing dreams. And then there’s Love and Peace wafting everywhere I go!

THE JANUARY 1st MINDSET

We’ve been this route lots of times, some of us many, many times. People say Happy New Year; maybe give a hug with an extra clap on the back. The New Year to-dos start to percolate. I start to think about de-Christmasing, outside lights away, live wreath that happily lasted for weeks and weeks discarded, pull down the boxes from the garage to start de-Christmasing inside. Hank and I have celebrated Christmas and New Year’s together 35 times so we have a routine which is the pretty much the same as last year’s routine.

Christmas Tree 2023 elm

EACH YEAR IS A LITTLE DIFFERENT

There may be new decorations.There may be some that have to be discarded. There’s a review of the holiday events that happened since Thanksgiving (all superb- holiday concerts, Pink Martini, a tree trim the likes of which has not been seen since 2019).

And there’s a little bit of something that means this really is a brand new year. We’ve never had this 2024 before. If I dwell on this thought, which I am, the idea gets bigger, better, happier. The possibilities become more and more real. it’s all about what I think it’s gonna be… I think it’s gonna be great.

MY WISH FOR YOU:

Here’s what’s coming your way too:  Happy times, pleasant weather, family and friends who adore you, feelings of well-being, gratitude, abundant health, success for your dreams and aspirations, peace and love … add you own.

HAPPY NEW YEAR!

Ethel Lee-Miller blogs regularly about people, the power of words, and her writing life. She retired after 30 years of teaching, semi-retired from coaching, editing, and gathering writers to publicly share their work. She is the author of Thinking of Miller Place, and Seedlings, Stories of Relationships. These days, in Tucson Arizona, she writes to inspire, to connect with folks, teaching about the power of words, gather writers together, and for the pure enjoyment of it. Ethel enjoys sharing stories at Odyssey Storytelling, Artists Standing Strong Together, and anywhere there’s a mic or a Zoom room.

 

Still Have Hugging on My Mind

GIVING HUGS, GETTING HUGS, SHARING HUGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HOLIDAYS ARE FOR HUGGING

A holiday party, a meeting, coffee with a friend, morning, afternoon and evening hugs with my sweetheart. I enjoy giving and getting hugs. Randon sample-  I probably shared 30 hugs this past Saturday. Loved it, every single one of them.

I’m a hugger. Besides the Christmas party Saturday hug fest, I was completely in the hug lover’s element in 2017 when we visited a local school in Kauai.

Let me start at the beginning. The following is a revised blog from the year I got more than 54 hugs in one day. It’s not just the quantity, but the quality of hugs that made those endorphins start whizzing around. 

54 HUGS IN ONE DAY –  2017

KIDS

Kids are amazing! Whether they’re pre-schoolers, wiggly giggly elementary age, highly energetic middle school, or inquisitive almost adult high school students, they capture my attention and heart. 

Even though I officially retired from teaching twenty years ago, if I have a choice to spend time with, entertain, or be entertained by kids, I’m there. So it was a no-brainer that when my friend Glenn mentioned his nephew and wife ran a charter school in Kauai, I immediately started figuring a way we could visit. 

The Kula Aupuni Niihau A Kahelelani Aloha (KANAKASchool is organized, busy, and welcoming. The school embraces an educational curriculum with respect for culture and people. The vision statement impressed me and impressed me even more during our visit.  

Following is the 2023 vision statement of Kanaka: Our vision is to educate our youth so that they may lead the direction for their own future and the future of Niihau by promoting, perpetuating and revitalizing the language of Olelo Kanaka.

A HAWAIIAN WELCOME

Hedy and Steve Sullivan, the director and admin staff respectively, greeted us. Our introduction to the students was held outside. Students and staff led us through an official ceremony with Hawaiian chants to ask permission to visit and chants of acceptance. Three of the younger students made what was probably a long walk for them across the yard to present each of us with a lei and hug. This was followed by the entire school population, students and staff greeting us with “Aloha” and a hug. The feelings? Acceptance, affection, and admiration.

INTERACTING WITH CHILDREN

With a small population, the classes are shared levels so my husband, friend, and I visited the mixed high school class during science and another class during Hawaiian instruction. We were enveloped with laughter and smiles and vying for camera shots with the middle school age kids, and then totally enchanted with sixteen K-2 students. Their teacher, Heather Neumen, graciously allowed me to do one of my favorite things–sing and do some interactive reciting with the kids. Like most little kids, it was a mix of outgoing, curious, loners, and shy ones. And like most kids they were quick to laugh, sing, and hug. What a treat!

Being around beautiful kids who were open and curious reminded me how precious all children are. I think it was Herbert Hoover who said, “Children are our greatest natural resource.”

I still recall that wonderful day and the easy hugs we all exchanged.

 

Ethel Lee-Miller blogs regularly about people, the power of words, and her writing life. She retired after 30 years of teaching, semi-retired from coaching, editing, and gathering writers to publicly share their work. She is the author of Thinking of Miller Place, and Seedlings, Stories of Relationships. These days, in Tucson Arizona, she writes to inspire, to connect with folks, teaching about the power of words, gather writers together, and for the pure enjoyment of it. Ethel enjoys sharing stories at Odyssey Storytelling, Artists Standing Strong Together, and anywhere there’s a mic or a Zoom room.

Odyssey Storytelling Presents: Winterizing, Dec. 7

Darkness before the light, preparing for the freeze, getting cold, staying warm, hibernating. Tucson fills with tourists and snowbirds, escaping to the sunshine, still our pipes freeze. But like lizards on a warm rock, desert dwellers enjoy the cooler weather.

Curated by Penelope Starr and Adam Hostetter
Produced by Ana Montanez

Consider your 3-minute true story for our spontaneous storytelling mid-show!

Location: The Screening Room, 127 E Congress St., Tucson, AZ 85701
Admission is $15.00
Tickets: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/odyssey-storytelling-winterizing-tickets-761442243247?aff=ebdsoporgprofile
Or pay at the door (card or cash). Patreon members: Your current membership gets you in free; please make sure to notify us if you are attending.

Interested in donating to Odyssey? Zelle us using this email: odysseystorytelling@gmail.com

Doors open at 6:30 pm
Stories begin at 7 pm
Downtown parking
Beer, wine & snacks available
Vaccination not required. Event will be indoors. Masks welcome.

Email stories@odysseystorytelling.com if you’d like to tell your own story on stage.

Ethel Lee-Miller blogs regularly about people, the power of words, and her writing life. She retired after 30 years of teaching, semi-retired from coaching, editing, and gathering writers to publicly share their work. She is the author of Thinking of Miller Place, and Seedlings, Stories of Relationships. These days, in Tucson Arizona, she writes to inspire, to connect with folks, teaching about the power of words, and for the pure enjoyment of it. Ethel enjoys sharing stories at Odyssey Storytelling, Artists Standing Strong Together, and anywhere there’s a mic or a Zoom room.